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About Journal

Management Science: Current Trends is a multidisciplinary peer reviewed journal that publishes articles on online which will be freely available as open access globally in all areas of managemental science. The journal publishes Original research, Review articles, Case study/Report, Letter to the editor, Editorials, Rapid responses, Analysis, Symposium pieces, Short communications, Interviews, Commentaries and Opinions of high standards.

Received manuscripts from the authors are subjected to follow double blind peer review process. Manuscripts are published only after the acceptance from at least two reviewers followed by the final decision from assigned editor.

Management Science: Current Trends covers various topics of current interest and trends in any area of management and business applications. Academicians, researchers, professionals, doctors and students all around the global are encouraged to submit their quality research findings or any other special issues related to the journal topics.

Call for Papers:

Management Science: Current Trends is accepting submissions for its inaugural issue (Vol 1-; Iss-1) and welcomes authors’ submissions. We wish, if you could write an article on any one of the topics mentioned in the journal highlights. Manuscripts can be submitted via online at submit or you can submit your article through e-mail at editor@crispusonline.com

Open Access statement:

This is an open access journal which means that all content is freely available without charge to the user or his/her institution. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author.

Benefits of open access for authors, include:

  • Free access for all users worldwide
  • Authors retain copyright to their work
  • Increased visibility and readership
  • Rapid publication
  • No spatial constraints

Business Strategy:

"Business strategy" redirects here. In the field of management, strategic management involves the formulation and implementation of the major goals and initiatives taken by an organization's top management on behalf of owners, based on consideration of resources and an assessment of the internal and external environments in which the organization operates


Decision Analysis:

Decision analysis refers to a systematic, quantitative and interactive approach to addressing and evaluating important choices confronted by organisations in the private and public sector. Decision analysis is interdisciplinary and draws on theories from the fields of psychology, economics, and management science.


Optimisation:

In mathematics, computer science and operations research, mathematical optimization or mathematical programming, alternatively spelled optimisation, is the selection of a best element (with regard to some criterion) from some set of available alternatives.


Economics:

Economics focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and how economies work. Microeconomics analyses basic elements in the economy, including individual agents and markets, their interactions, and the outcomes of interactions. Individual agents may include, for example, households, firms, buyers, and sellers. Macroeconomics analyses the entire economy (meaning aggregated production, consumption, savings, and investment) and issues affecting it, including unemployment of resources (labour, capital, and land), inflation, economic growth, and the public policies that address these issues (monetary, fiscal, and other policies).


Financial Management:

Financial Management is a vital activity in any organization. It is the process of planning, organizing, controlling and monitoring financial resources with a view to achieve organizational goals and objectives.


Risk management:

Risk management is the identification, evaluation, and prioritization of risks followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor, and control the probability or impact of unfortunate events or to maximize the realization of opportunities.


Revenue management:

Revenue management is an extremely important concept within the hospitality industry, because it allows hotel owners to anticipate demand and optimise availability and pricing, in order to achieve the best possible financial results


Marketing science:

Marketing science is a field that approaches marketing – the understanding of customer needs, and the development of approaches by which they might be fulfilled – predominantly through scientific methods, rather than through tools and techniques common with research in the arts or in humanities.


Operations management:

Operations management is the administration of business practices to create the highest level of efficiency possible within an organization. It is concerned with converting materials and labour into goods and services as efficiently as possible to maximize the profit of an organization.


Organisations:

An organization or organisation is an entity comprising multiple people, such as an institution or an association, which has a particular purpose. The word is derived from the Greek word organon, which means tool or instrument, musical instrument, and organ. 


Product Development:

Product development, also called new product management, is a series of steps that includes the conceptualization, design, development and marketing of newly created or newly rebranded goods or services.


Product management:

Product management is an organisational lifecycle function within a company dealing with the planning, forecasting, and production, or marketing of a product or products at all stages of the product lifecycle. Similarly, product lifecycle management (PLM) integrates people, data, processes and business systems.


Service science:

Service science, management, and engineering (SSME) is a term introduced by IBM to describe service science, an interdisciplinary approach to the study, design, and implementation of service systems – complex systems in which specific arrangements of people and technologies take actions that provide value for others.


Stochastic Model:

A stochastic model is a tool for estimating probability distributions of potential outcomes by allowing for random variation in one or more inputs over time. The random variation is usually based on fluctuations observed in historical data for a selected period using standard time-series techniques.


Data mining:

Data mining is the process of discovering patterns in large data sets involving methods at the intersection of machine learning, statistics, and database systems.


Decision analysis:

Decision analysis refers to a systematic, quantitative and interactive approach to addressing and evaluating important choices confronted by organisations in the private and public sector. Decision analysis is interdisciplinary and draws on theories from the fields of psychology, economics, and management science.


Classical economics:

Classical economics or classical political economy is a school of thought in economics that flourished, primarily in Britain, in the late 18th and early-to-mid 19th century. Its main thinkers are held to be Adam Smith, Jean-Baptiste Say, David Ricardo, Thomas Robert Malthus, and John Stuart Mill. These economists produced a theory of market economies as largely self-regulating systems, governed by natural laws of production and exchange (famously captured by Adam Smith's metaphor of the invisible hand).


Development economics:

Development economics is a branch of economics that focuses on improving fiscal, economic and social conditions in developing countries. Development economics considers factors such as health, education, working conditions, domestic and international policies, and market conditions.


Econometrics:

Econometrics is the application of statistical methods to economic data in order to give empirical content to economic relationships. More precisely, it is "the quantitative analysis of actual economic phenomena based on the concurrent development of theory and observation, related by appropriate methods of inference".


Economic Capital:

In finance, mainly for financial services firms, economic capital is the amount of risk capital, assessed on a realistic basis, which a firm requires to cover the risks that it is running or collecting as a going concern, such as market risk, credit risk, legal risk, and operational risk. It is the amount of money which is needed to secure survival in a worst-case scenario. Firms and financial services regulators should then aim to hold risk capital of an amount equal at least to economic capital.


Economic Indicator:

An economic indicator is a statistic about an economic activity. Economic indicators allow analysis of economic performance and predictions of future performance. One application of economic indicators is the study of business cycles.


Economic transparency:

Economic transparency refers to banks and other financial institutions that have made data available about their financial position and condition. Some economists assert that transparency is one of the most effective methods for regulation of economy.


Entrepreneurial Development:

Entrepreneurship development is the process of improving the skills and knowledge of entrepreneurs through various training and classroom programs. The whole point of entrepreneurship development is to increase the number of entrepreneurs.


Financial economics:

Financial economics is a branch of economics that analyses the use and distribution of resources in markets in which decisions are made under uncertainty. Financial decisions must often take into account future events, whether those be related to individual stocks, portfolios or the market as a whole.


Game theory:

Game theory is the study of mathematical models of strategic interaction between rational decision-makers. It has applications in all fields of social science, as well as in logic and computer science. Originally, it addressed zero-sum games, in which one person's gains result in losses for the other participants. Today, game theory applies to a wide range of behavioural relations, and is now an umbrella term for the science of logical decision making in humans, animals, and computers.


Hospitality Management:

A hospitality manager plays an important role in overseeing the administrative tasks of a hotel, resort or casino chain. He or she may ensure that a hotel is adhering to state regulations. You should have a passion for tourism and improving the experience that tourists have when they are on vacation.


Innovation Policy:

The Innovation Policy Platform (IPP), developed by the World Bank Group and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), is a web-based interactive space that provides easy access to knowledge, learning resources, indicators and communities of practice on the design, implementation, and evaluation of innovation policies. The Platform helps users learn how innovation systems operate, identify good practices across different countries, conduct statistical benchmarking and devise and apply effective policy solutions. More broadly, it facilitates knowledge exchange and collaboration across countries and regions.


Monetary Neutrality:

Neutrality of money is the idea that a change in the stock of money affects only nominal variables in the economy such as prices, wages, and exchange rates, with no effect on real variables, like employment, real GDP, and real consumption.


New Economy:

The new economy is the result of the transition from a manufacturing-based economy to a service-based economy. This particular use of the term was popular during the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s.


Total quality management (TQM):

Total quality management (TQM) consists of organization-wide efforts to "install and make permanent climate where employees continuously improve their ability to provide on demand products and services that customers will find of particular value."


Welfare economics:

Welfare economics is a branch of economics that uses microeconomic techniques to evaluate well-being (welfare) at the aggregate (economy-wide) level.


DSS (Decision Support System):

A decision support system (DSS) is an information system that supports business or organizational decision-making activities. DSSs serve the management.


Ecological Engineering:

Ecological Engineering is the emerging field of the use of ecological processes within natural or constructed imitation of natural systems to achieve engineering goals.


Forecasting:

Forecasting is the process of making predictions of the future based on past and present data and most commonly by analysis of trends. A commonplace example might be estimation of some variable of interest at some specified future date. Prediction is a similar, but more general term. Both might refer to formal statistical methods employing time series, cross-sectional or longitudinal data, or alternatively to less formal judgmental methods. Usage can differ between areas of application: for example, in hydrology the terms "forecast" and "forecasting" are sometimes reserved for estimates of values at certain specific future times, while the term "prediction" is used for more general estimates, such as the number of times floods will occur over a long period.


Industrial Management:

Industrial organization or industrial economy is a field that builds on the theory of the firm by examining the structure of (and, therefore, the boundaries between) firms and markets. Industrial organization adds real-world complications to the perfectly competitive model, complications such as transaction costs, limited information, and barriers to entry of new firms that may be associated with imperfect competition.


Information management:

Information management (IM) is the process by which relevant information is provided to decision-makers in a timely manner. Information management has largely been defined from an information systems perspective and equated with the management of information technology.


Project management:

Project management is the practice of initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing the work of a team to achieve specific goals and meet specific success criteria at the specified time.


Scheduling and Control:

The objective of many business projects is to meet and exceed customer expectations. Integrated project management is the new business mantra, wherein project management is an integral process of the execution of the strategic plan.


Simulation:

A simulation is an approximate imitation of the operation of a process or system; the act of simulating first requires a model is developed. This model is a well-defined description of the simulated subject, and represents its key characteristics, such as its behaviour, functions and abstract or physical properties.


Supply Chain Management:

The management of the flow of goods and services involves the movement and storage of raw materials, of work-in-process inventory, and of finished goods from point of origin to point of consumption. Interconnected or interlinked networks, channels and node businesses combine in the provision of products and services required by end customers in a supply chain.


Civil Engineering Management:

The job market increasingly is seeking engineers who are true process thinkers, and who can oversee, analyse and predict all aspects of the design and execution of civil engineering projects. The Master's programm in Civil Engineering and Management will train you to be exactly that kind of engineer.


Transportation Optimization: 

Transportation Optimization is the process of determining the most efficient means of moving product to the customer while maintaining a desired service level, given a static supply chain network.


Journal is Currently Abstracted/Indexed in Google Scholoar,SSRN,ScienceOpen

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